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View Full Version : Front of 75 gallon aquarium 1/8" lower than back, do I have a problem?



geotek
12-13-2015, 10:30 PM
I have a 75 gallon aquarium on a Topfin particle board stand. It appears quite sturdy and the reviews for the stand suggest that it is quite sturdy as well. In the year it has been set up, the stand has settled into the carpet and now the front is 1/8" lower than the back. In people's experience, is there a problem at this point with uneven stresses on the aquarium or stand? Both front corners are equal in height as are both back corners. How far off level can aquariums and their stand safely handle?

Mog Carns
12-14-2015, 08:55 AM
That's the same question as "How deep can this submarine go before it implodes?"
It is one of those questions you cannot answer without ruin.


Smaller the tank, the more off level it can be.
Same with tanks that are less tall...


1/8inch on a 75... I would drain it and shim it.

aXio
12-14-2015, 10:23 AM
I completely agree with Jeremy on this. With a tank that size I would absolutely drain the water and shim it get it level.

Leaving it uneven like that might be OK in the short term... but over time It will put uneven pressure on the seams of the tank which can cause major problems down the line. Either way this is the type of problem to take care of now and not wait till later or there is an issue.

Jakub

mountainman36
12-14-2015, 11:38 AM
try pulling out from the wall a little. the tack strips to hold the carpet can make the floor unlevel. that may be what has happened. But yes, drain it and move it or shim it. It probably would be fine. i have seen a friends 125 leaning about an inch and it was fine for the few years he lived in that apartment, but i didnt like the look of it....

Tangfan
12-14-2015, 01:50 PM
The opposite viewpoint of the above (which I must admit, I mostly agree with) is that to get a 1/8" difference in the water level over 18" (width of a 75 gallon tank), the degree of angel that is being observed on the front glass is less than 1/2 degree. Since the force of concern here is the downward force on the front glass (this would additive force of that the glass would see to "push the glass out and bow, or break a seal) would be the force multiplied by the tangent of the angle. The tangent of the angle is ~ 0.06 which would make whatever additive force relatively small. To me this would indicate that the need to shim the tank is minor when you consider the well being of the tank.

Opposite side would be the aesthetics and if that 1/8? would bother the OCD that we all have buried in us to some degree.

It is amazing how I have chosen to remember how to use Statics and Dynamics (this is more statics since it is a non-moving force) that I learned in college. My parents would be proud at the money they spent for this knowledge. LOL

It should also be noted that older tanks had thicker glass that could withstand these types of force changes better then the newer tanks which have been "Cheapened" to maintain a desired selling point while maintaining a certain level of safety (this safety level I do not believe is regulated by any agency at this time).

geotek
12-14-2015, 08:04 PM
Thanks for the responses. The stand is already 3" out from the wall specifically to avoid tack strips, and to make running cords easier. It sounds like something that should be addressed, but not an emergency then.
As to draining the tank, does that mean completely empty or leaving the substrate and a few inches of water so I don't have to tear down the tank and try to catch the corydoras who seem to love the tank. I have a crowbar, wooden wedges and an assistant. I've never tried to shim a tank I didn't completely empty so I was wondering how this is approached.

mountainman36
12-15-2015, 07:47 AM
i think you can shim it with a little water and gravel in it. shim the stand, not the tank. thats what ive done in the past. takes two people, one to hold the tank, the other to shim.

Nice response Tangfan - well thought out, and you are probably right. My concern is more of it falling over.

djramsey
12-15-2015, 07:58 AM
Please, the word 'crowbar' and '75 gallon aquarium with water in it' should never be used together. There just is not a happy ending. Drain enough water that someone can dead lift the tank and stand enough to get something under the low in to level it out. And consider it may not be the carpeting, it may be the floor. Or the stand itself. Was it level when you first filled the tank?

aXio
12-15-2015, 08:38 AM
Please, the word 'crowbar' and '75 gallon aquarium with water in it' should never be used together.

:rofl::rofl::rofl:


Please, the word 'crowbar' and '75 gallon aquarium with water in it' should never be used together. There just is not a happy ending. Drain enough water that someone can dead lift the tank and stand enough to get something under the low in to level it out. And consider it may not be the carpeting, it may be the floor. Or the stand itself. Was it level when you first filled the tank?

I do agree. Best to just drain it enough for some one to be able to dead lift the tank. The jacks and crowbars make me nervous as well. They put too much pressure on one point of the stand... could risk breaking/cracking the stand. Particle board is really strong if made properly... but is still fairly brittle.

Jakub

Garfieldnfish
12-15-2015, 05:31 PM
Since my floor in the fish room is uneven I have several tanks that are a little "off" and have been for years. No problems so far. Keeping my fingers crossed.

geotek
12-15-2015, 08:28 PM
The tank was level when first filled. Even though the aquarium sits on a concrete slab, there is no guarantee that the slab was perfectly level. Fortunately it has stayed level under the 135. Yes, I will drain the tank enough that the stand can be dead lifted.

What is a good source of a 1/8" shim? Should I get some wooden paint stirrer sticks? Do they still make those of wood?
Thanks to everyone responding, I really appreciate the input.
I've never done this and I am trying to avoid any unpleasantness so I will drain the tank down to 3 or 4 inches and have the helper dead lift, no crowbars or hydraulic jacks will be used.

Mog Carns
12-16-2015, 08:41 AM
Home depot sells a pack of wooden shims (thin wooden wedges) for about $2
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded-8-in-Homeowner-Shims-12-Per-Bundle-PSH8-12-12/100082960

The idea is that you lift up the tank to levelish, hammer in the shims til level is perfect, then break off the unsightly excess.

Mog Carns
12-16-2015, 09:02 AM
Home depot sells a pack of wooden shims (thin wooden wedges) for about $2
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Unbranded-8-in-Homeowner-Shims-12-Per-Bundle-PSH8-12-12/100082960

The idea is that you lift up the tank to levelish, hammer in two shims point at point til level is perfect, then break off the unsightly excess. See pic below.

Clarity: https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.renovation-headquarters.com/images20/window-shims.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.renovation-headquarters.com/replacement-window-installation-2.html&h=219&w=475&tbnid=J6XA2WUz8ntxNM:&docid=sB3kQIhPBcTY1M&ei=5G1xVp2nHsWzmwGRnKmQAQ&tbm=isch&ved=0ahUKEwidqc_YxODJAhXF2SYKHRFOChIQMwgsKBEwEQ