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View Full Version : What has the greatest impact on bio load in a cycled planted aquarium?



Samong
02-05-2016, 09:58 AM
I'm just looking for discussion and education on the matter. I know that the media you use affects surface area for the bio filter, but so does the gallons-per-hour of whatever filter you're using. Aquarium plants also factor in, especially fast-growing or prolific plants.

So what do you feel has the biggest role in the bio load of a cycled aquarium?

Tropical
02-05-2016, 10:55 AM
I would say the filter's biological filtration is the most important (Bio balls, lava rock, ceramic rings), and then fast growing plants such as elodea/anarchis, water lettuce, duckweed, water Sprite....

Water changes are also important...

I think I just rewrote your post, you kind of answered your own question!

Samong
02-05-2016, 05:40 PM
:laugh: Hahaha, I guess I did. I've worked a lot on my planted tanks but now I'm wondering if my bio filtration could be better in my actual canister filters. All the trays have filter floss, but only one in three trays actually has ceramic rings. My water parameters have been good but the tanks have been understocked the last six months when I lost a lot of fish in a disaster move. I'm starting to build my fish back up (amorous plecos, lol) so it's probably a wise move to just go ahead and buy a ton of biomedia and fill up that unused space.

Tangfan
02-05-2016, 06:00 PM
Biomass doesn't have to be bio balls or ceramic pieces. Biomass can be floss (loads of surface area) or pebbles/ gravel. Bottom line, anything with surface area with flow going over it will house bacteria. This includes plant leaves.

Larry Bugg
02-05-2016, 06:37 PM
keep in mind that increasing your biomass won't necessarily increase the beneficial bacteria needed for bio-filtration. Your tank will only produce x amount of benefical bacteria dictated by the amount of waste your fish produce. You cannot go over that limit, no matter how much biomass you have.

Tropical
02-05-2016, 07:18 PM
keep in mind that increasing your biomass won't necessarily increase the beneficial bacteria needed for bio-filtration. Your tank will only produce x amount of benefical bacteria dictated by the amount of waste your fish produce. You cannot go over that limit, no matter how much biomass you have.
Huh that's interesting, never thought about that. However if there's more media then when you do add fish the BB can reproduce faster, right?

Larry Bugg
02-05-2016, 07:49 PM
Huh that's interesting, never thought about that. However if there's more media then when you do add fish the BB can reproduce faster, right?

Only if the current media is saturated with bacteria and can't sustain anymore. If there is plenty of room on the existing media then additional media is not going to increase it faster.

Tropical
02-05-2016, 08:46 PM
True, good point. What is your preferred media for biological filtration?

Larry Bugg
02-05-2016, 09:11 PM
I breed discus and angelfish along with some of the dwarf cichlids. No display tanks. All my tanks are set up for breeding so all my tanks have sponge filters.

Tropical
02-05-2016, 09:13 PM
Interesting, so basically only biological filtration(and some mechanical), so you're an expert for this thread!

:grin: What kinds of Dwarf Cichlids?

Larry Bugg
02-06-2016, 07:52 AM
Nope, not an expert by any means, but I do know a little about bio filtration. I took my fish room down to move so I don't have much at this time but I enjoy breeding Rams and apistos.

The original question was what has the biggest impact on bio load in planted tanks and I think the op answered his own question with bio filtration. I think this is the biggest factor in any tank whether it is planted or bare bottom. While other things impact bio load, nothing is greater.