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View Full Version : anyone reseals aquariums?



quepiid
08-24-2016, 08:44 PM
i have a 75 gallon i bought about 6 months ago and its been up and running since then but the seems look old and i would like to reseal it, afraid ill mess it up thought. i got the aquarium for really cheap so really dont want to spend alot on doing this but does anyone know a place i can take it or anyone that does this?

aXio
08-25-2016, 09:05 AM
i have a 75 gallon i bought about 6 months ago and its been up and running since then but the seems look old and i would like to reseal it, afraid ill mess it up thought. i got the aquarium for really cheap so really dont want to spend alot on doing this but does anyone know a place i can take it or anyone that does this?


Unfortunately there are no stores/businesses that reseal tanks in Georgia. Just WAY too much liability it in. And honestly with the cost to get something like that done you are probably better off buying a new aquarium. The only way I see it being cost effective to reseal an aquarium is to do it yourself or have a friend do it with out charging for the labor.

Tropical
08-25-2016, 08:44 PM
+1 Jakob! Adding to what he said, it's also very hard to remove the trim, as that is glued on tight, and by trying to remove it you can break that or the glass...(don't ask how I know, LOL)

Also if it doesn't work, and then breaks that's a lot of water damage... Definitely would get a new one/one that doesn't leak. You could try selling it on Craigslist as a reptile tank...

canoe
08-27-2016, 04:27 AM
Would you need to actually reseal it? What about adding a bead to each joint, over the existing sealant, to reinforce what is already in place? It might not look as nice as a new tank, but certainly it would be cost-effective if you do it yourself. Make sure the silicone sealant is suitable for aquariums, which cures without generating acetic acid (CH3COOH aka vinegar). It can be purchased in a 10.x ounce caulking tube.

Having a clean, dry surface is important. Vinegar can be used to remove any mineral build-up. Apply like most other caulk - lay down a bead and smooth it out with your finger or a tool. If you happen to get some in the wrong place, resist the temptation to wipe it off. Let it cure and then use a single-edge razor blade to remove it.

quepiid
08-29-2016, 09:29 AM
Would you need to actually reseal it? What about adding a bead to each joint, over the existing sealant, to reinforce what is already in place? It might not look as nice as a new tank, but certainly it would be cost-effective if you do it yourself. Make sure the silicone sealant is suitable for aquariums, which cures without generating acetic acid (CH3COOH aka vinegar). It can be purchased in a 10.x ounce caulking tube.

Having a clean, dry surface is important. Vinegar can be used to remove any mineral build-up. Apply like most other caulk - lay down a bead and smooth it out with your finger or a tool. If you happen to get some in the wrong place, resist the temptation to wipe it off. Let it cure and then use a single-edge razor blade to remove it.


I was was under the impression that reinforcing would work because new silicon won't stick to old silicon. But if that would work I would definitely do this instead. The tank doesn't leak at all. I just want to make sure I keep it that way.

canoe
08-29-2016, 04:56 PM
Go for it. Silicone sealer is amazing stuff. Like I said previously, having a clean, dry surface is important. You may find it easier to lay down a bead when the seam is in a horizontal position, i.e. lay the tank on its side when applying sealer to the 4 corners formed by the adjacent sides of the tank. For best results, make sure the silicone always contacts and bridges the glass of adjacent sides.