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incredibleSE
09-21-2016, 07:20 PM
Hey guys. I'm starting a small 10 gal tank and will be running a sponge filter in it. This is my first time using a sponge filter in a tank. Does the capacity of the aerator matter to the function of the sponge filter? I have a used Tetra Whisper that's rated for 10 gal. Not sure if I needed some more umpf for better functionality for the filter.

bluefalcon505
09-21-2016, 07:42 PM
I would get one that's rated a little more and the ability to adjust the pressure you want it to be at. Also look into hamburger mattenfilter (HMF). This is mine. http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20160921/6b98392e061b926fad0774161351bd89.jpg

bluefalcon505
09-21-2016, 07:43 PM
It's running by air pump

Demonfish
09-23-2016, 01:20 AM
Try it. You want a steady stream of bubbles, but not so much that water goes over the side. Do use a valve so you can adjust the flow. Adding an air stone is a personal preference, smaller bubbles are quieter, but stones need to be replaced periodically when they clog and the flow slows. More flow does help the filter, but you don't want to have to keep the tank half empty from turbulence. The other factor on the filtration effectiveness is the size of the sponge. A normal sponge if fine for a few fish, but you might want to go up to a bigger sponge if you are raising a lot of fry in a small tank. The mattenfilter is a sponge wall. Sponge filters with good water changes are very effective and fry safe.

You can tell you need a bigger pump when the flow slows or stops when the filter or just an air-hose from the pump is at the bottom of the tank. The "10 gallons" the pump is rated for means is should pump the bottom of the 10 gallon tank (10"), if it doesn't, get another pump (ask someone to bring one to the auction) or try replacing the diaphragm or other repair.

fishman
09-27-2016, 07:26 PM
Curious,why a sponge filter vs a "hang on back" power filter? I would think in a tank as small as 10 gallons,you would want to maximize the in tank space for the fish/plants/rocks etc instead of using it for a internal filter?

bluefalcon505
09-27-2016, 07:43 PM
Because depending on what you're keeping, HOB can be to much for them.

fishman
09-28-2016, 07:53 PM
Because depending on what you're keeping, HOB can be to much for them.

You can get HOB filters with flow as low as 8-9 gallons per HOUR,so I do not see that as a valid reason IMO.

HN1
09-28-2016, 08:23 PM
You can get HOB filters with flow as low as 8-9 gallons per HOUR,so I do not see that as a valid reason IMO.

8-9 G / hr wouldn't be sufficient turnover to keep much of anything. While you may give up a small area of the tank with a sponge filter, it is still going to be more efficient in the long run. No media required. Also, a sponge filter can be a terrific asset for tanks with potential nano fry or shrimplets likely to be housed in a tank such as a 10G.

fishman
09-28-2016, 09:48 PM
I agree on the flow of 8-9 gph being to low......my point was not choosing a HOB because "it could be too much" is not valid.Further,one could certainly attach a sponge to the intake of a HOB and solve other issues without having a traditional air driven sponge filter taking up valuable real estate {plus they are ugly as hell to look at imo}.To each his own.

bluefalcon505
09-28-2016, 10:00 PM
Lol, it sounds no matter what we tell you the reason for the option. You're going to be negative about it and is pointless to discuss it with you. Which hijacking the post is not helpful to the op.

HN1
09-28-2016, 10:05 PM
I agree on the flow of 8-9 gph being to low......my point was not choosing a HOB because "it could be too much" is not valid.Further,one could certainly attach a sponge to the intake of a HOB and solve other issues without having a traditional air driven sponge filter taking up valuable real estate {plus they are ugly as hell to look at imo}.To each his own.

Indeed. To each their own. I've run hundreds of tank iterations with sponges, HOBs, canisters, sumps, etc. They each have correct AND specific applications. To disregard any of them without knowing the details of the application is very short sighted and inexperienced IMHO.

What are your current set ups? What fish have you bred and raised? A sponge over an intake does not equal a sponge filter. There is filter media that has to be maintained or changed which comes with other concerns. A sponge filter can alleviate those. Have you ever ran a tank on air?

fishman
09-29-2016, 12:47 AM
Indeed. To each their own. I've run hundreds of tank iterations with sponges, HOBs, canisters, sumps, etc. They each have correct AND specific applications. To disregard any of them without knowing the details of the application is very short sighted and inexperienced IMHO.



AGREE....which is why I originally posted TO THE ORIGINAL AUTHOR of this thread that I was curious as to WHY he wanted to try a sponge,in an attempt to learn what he planned to keep in the tank,their bio load,and other specifics that would attempt to help him pick the best product for his application.....he never replied,others were quick to show their own setups{who cares if it is not anywhere close to HIS needs},and answer for him without asking him squat about what he planned on keeping in that tank?

As to your questioning my experience,well lets just say over 50 years of fish keeping,from salt water to fresh- Piranha to Discus{current} Worked in 2 of the top Aquarium stores in Baltimore during College.......I have probably used filters many have only seen in old pictures.lol.

incredibleSE
10-03-2016, 03:36 PM
Curious,why a sponge filter vs a "hang on back" power filter? I would think in a tank as small as 10 gallons,you would want to maximize the in tank space for the fish/plants/rocks etc instead of using it for a internal filter?

I'm stocking the tank with a betta and possibly some shrimp. The sponge filter I'm running on it is pretty small, fits into the corner and doesn't really take up much room. It's not one of those giant sponge filters.

fishman
10-03-2016, 04:22 PM
Great,sounds like a low stocked tank-and as long as you do not grossly overfeed,your intended filter should do the job fine.If you decide down the road you want to add chemical filtration {example,Purigen,carbon,etc} you would then need to reconsider your filter choice.Good luck with the new tank,shrimp are fascinating to watch.

incredibleSE
10-03-2016, 08:18 PM
Great,sounds like a low stocked tank-and as long as you do not grossly overfeed,your intended filter should do the job fine.If you decide down the road you want to add chemical filtration {example,Purigen,carbon,etc} you would then need to reconsider your filter choice.Good luck with the new tank,shrimp are fascinating to watch.

5038

Sorry about the bad lighting but wanted to show you the setup. I have a couple danios in it currently to cycle it but the tank had been running for a year with a HOB that failed recently, that's why I was looking into switching to a sponge filter. That and stocking a betta led me to the change.

HN1
10-03-2016, 08:29 PM
I'm stocking the tank with a betta and possibly some shrimp. The sponge filter I'm running on it is pretty small, fits into the corner and doesn't really take up much room. It's not one of those giant sponge filters.

In most cases a betta will pick off any shrimp it can. You may find yourself with a very happy betta and few to no shrimp.

incredibleSE
10-03-2016, 08:33 PM
Thanks for the heads up. I'm not set on the shrimp idea and your input is pushing me to not stock the tank with them. I use to raise a crawfish in the same tank but it was an escape artist. It made out out of the tank, got out of the room and ended up in the living room downstairs..

Demonfish
10-05-2016, 05:58 AM
The other air-driven filter basic is to keep the pump above the tank or use a one-way check valve. Its not good to get water siphoning into the pump or onto the floor if the power goes out. That sponge should be fine for a betta, just squeeze it out into the bucket when you do water changes and rinse in the sink with luke-warm water when it gets groody.