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Gibbletest
11-14-2016, 11:45 AM
I am setting up a new tank. I was going to use filter media from an existing tank to set up the new tank. However I am concerned that i may introduce black beard algae into the tank. Is this possible? Thanks


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Tropical
11-14-2016, 11:56 AM
I don't think so, if the filter media was kept dark(algae needs light). I wouldn't treat with anything as that could kill the beneficial bacteria.


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Gibbletest
11-14-2016, 11:59 AM
Ok. I really want to try and keep it out of this tank. It is a smaller tanks so getting rid of algae could be difficult.


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joecoulson
11-14-2016, 01:28 PM
I would time it with a water change on an existing tank so that you could use some of the water in addition to the filter media


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Tropical
11-14-2016, 02:08 PM
Ok. I really want to try and keep it out of this tank. It is a smaller tanks so getting rid of algae could be difficult.


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If you're really concerned I'd not add any old filter media, not 100% guaranteed algae free.


I would time it with a water change on an existing tank so that you could use some of the water in addition to the filter media


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I disagree with this, the actual water contains very little beneficial bacteria, would not help with the cycle...


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Tangfan
11-14-2016, 02:19 PM
Algae is a spore type of plant if I understand it correctly, so if a piece broke off, it could end up in a filter. Although, if the filter is an external filter, that spore would have to then transfer itself back out of the filter into the tank. Inside a HOB or canister filter, there is low light so the spore should not multiple quickly allowing for it to transfer out.

With all this said, using filter media from a tank with BB algae could introduce it to a new tank, but if you change the filter media out after ~ 1 week, the risk should be kept to a minimum. Using Tank water elevates the risk since the spore could be free moving in the water column. I would not use the water (even the beneficial bacteria in the water would be minimal, it prefers to be on a surface).

Good luck.

Gibbletest
11-14-2016, 02:30 PM
Ok. I will keep that in mind. I may get a algae eater too just in case. But I think I may be limited by the tank size. It is a spec v. Maybe an otocinclus


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Tangfan
11-14-2016, 03:08 PM
Ok. I will keep that in mind. I may get a algae eater too just in case. But I think I may be limited by the tank size. It is a spec v. Maybe an otocinclus


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From my own experience fighting BB algae, the only algae eater that really eats BB algae is a Siamese Algae Eater. Can typically get a small one in the 1.5 inch range, but they do grow to ~ 4-5 inches. Hydrogen Peroxide dip or using Excel works on the BB as well.

I am sure there are others out there with more experience than I on this though.

Rodriguez
03-18-2017, 01:19 AM
I need to know what is the tank size and do you have a canister filter?

Gibbletest
03-18-2017, 08:20 AM
It is a fluval spec v. It is around 5 gallons and the filter is part of the aquarium. It is on the side and a water pump pulls the water through the filter media. No algae so far but I am having trouble getting it cycled. It has been up for 2 months but ammonia doesn't go down. I used a seeded filter media and have been adding a bacterial additive more recently. With my other tank it took a couple of months for the ammonia to not show up on the test. I am hoping things change quickly since the auction is coming soon.


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heatherbeast
03-18-2017, 08:40 AM
What is your ammonia reading? Tap water, particularly municipal water, will often give false readings of 0.25 ppm ammonia when there is none. What are your nitrites and nitrates reading? If you are having real ammonia readings, the proportions of nitrite/nitrate to ammonia can tell you where you are in your cycle.

Also, be sure to shake the second reagent bottle for nitrates until you feel like your elbow is going to fall off, it has a habit of settling out of solution.

Gibbletest
03-18-2017, 09:13 AM
The ammonia is at 3 ppm, the nitrates and nitrites weren't showing up or slightly above 0.


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heatherbeast
03-18-2017, 09:18 AM
The ammonia is at 3 ppm, the nitrates and nitrites weren't showing up or slightly above 0.


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Yiiiiiiiiiiiikes. D: What about the pH? Nitrifying bacteria do best at pH 6.5 or higher.

Rodriguez
03-20-2017, 12:03 AM
It is the best way to find out the solution if you have a canister filter (http://fishboxpro.com/best-canister-filter-review/). There is no needed any air pump, supplements, you don't have to check out again and again the pH level, ammonia, nitrite. The canister filter removes all the germs and your fishes can get the fresh water all time.

Rodriguez
03-20-2017, 12:08 AM
There is a best solution if you have a canister filter (http://fishboxpro.com/best-canister-filter-review/). It will give you the best performance. You don't have to check out the pH level again and again. IF you keep in your aquarium, there is no needed any supplements and it maintains very easy. You can try.