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View Full Version : German Blue ram spawn - finally!



Igster
05-28-2012, 06:01 PM
Had a pair of German Blue rams spawn, finally...and then I went and blew it :( Got the fry to free swimming stage, was giving them decap BS and microworms...decided to turn the light off in the tank one night. Next morning, I noticed the parents gobbling up everything !

This was their second spawn...first one was in a community tank, and the eggs didn't survive so I took out the parents and put 'em alone in a 10-gallon.

I don't have another tank to put them in, so should I just leave their light on at night the next time they spawn?

Demonfish
05-28-2012, 06:02 PM
yes. You can't do it forever, but for awhile its a good trick. You could also try a light in the room, but not on the tank.

stevenjohn21
05-28-2012, 10:38 PM
If they are the same as breeding Kribensis then the parents should get the hang of it by the 3rd time, although mine took 4 attempts before not eating the eggs. Since my tank was in the bedroom i couldnt leave a bright light on so i placed a battery operated flash light next to the tank to help the parents out.

nalu86
05-29-2012, 12:09 AM
The parents will always eat the fry.
separate them before they go free swimming.

Demonfish
05-29-2012, 01:08 AM
not always. I have a had few seemingly incurable egg eaters, and one wiggler-eater, but many cichlid pairs will eventually "get the hang of it". Especially if they make it to free swimming, there is a good chance at least one parent will raise them to decent size. If you can get the parents to do the work (picking fungus eggs, aerating, herding to food and away from siphons) it is so much easier. If i have a pair that eats several spawns at wiggler or egg stage, I will sometimes pull an egg-covered rock or siphon off some wigglers for myself to try. If you get good at artificial rearing, you can get larger yields, but IME parent-raised are often healthier.

nalu86
05-29-2012, 01:28 AM
The Rams he is talking about was a proven pair that I sold him.
I Raised them after 7 days of freeswimming, because the female that was taking care of them started eating the fry.
I had several batches of fry by them and I tried the parents to raise the fry, but after 5-7 days every time they were bored of taking care of the fry and ate them. It didn't help if I tried to let the male or the female rais them.

The fry I'm selling right now, is bred by this pair and another pair, 80 of them.

I recommend to artificial hatch the fry with methaline blue. Or take the parents out, or the fry before they go freeswimming.

Also, get a bigger tank for the pair (20gal or bigger). They sometimes need their privacy and will start bullying each other (chance of loosing a proven pair).


not always. I have a had few seemingly incurable egg eaters, and one wiggler-eater, but many cichlid pairs will eventually "get the hang of it". Especially if they make it to free swimming, there is a good chance at least one parent will raise them to decent size. If you can get the parents to do the work (picking fungus eggs, aerating, herding to food and away from siphons) it is so much easier. If i have a pair that eats several spawns at wiggler or egg stage, I will sometimes pull an egg-covered rock or siphon off some wigglers for myself to try. If you get good at artificial rearing, you can get larger yields, but IME parent-raised are often healthier.

Igster
05-29-2012, 06:04 AM
The male actually chased the female away from the eggs and newly hatched fry, and only let her back a couple days after they were free swimming. I will try to set up a 20 for them and provide more hiding spots - I have plenty of java moss and water sprite :)

Demonfish
05-29-2012, 08:15 AM
IMO, getting them free swimming is the hard part. After that you could move them to a small, clean tank and raise like angel fry. But cichlids are smart enough to learn. Some seem not to have good instincts ever, some learn eggs taste good, but some can learn to be good parents.

pawslover
05-29-2012, 10:41 AM
I think it helps to have dither fish, not just parents & fry in the tank. If they have to defend their young against outside threats, they seem more inclined to be good parents.

Demonfish
05-29-2012, 10:43 AM
dithers can help, but in a "one-pair's-territory-sized" tank like a 10 for rams, the parents often kill any other fish.

pawslover
05-29-2012, 10:57 AM
Oh, yeah, not in a 10. I've never had luck with anything in a 10 except livebearers & shrimp.

nalu86
05-29-2012, 01:12 PM
I stay with my point, GBR's are bad parents, Bugman will tel you the same.
I read a lot about them spawning, and only read couple of cases when they raised the fry and those were wild caught or F1's

Demonfish
05-29-2012, 01:57 PM
In the wild there is strong selective pressure for good parenting. After many generations of line breeding with artificial rearing, fish can lose the strong instincts. But if you get one pair that raises their own, you can select for good parenting.