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View Full Version : African Hybrid Love them or hate them???



the_cichlid_kid99
06-15-2013, 11:03 PM
So what's your guys opinion about hybrids? Good or bad

Demonfish
06-16-2013, 12:43 AM
Hate hate hate. Plenty of species in the lakes.

oxheart
06-16-2013, 12:47 AM
hybrids have no value . I breed a lot of Africans and I buy a lot , many times sight unseen . It is annoying to buy something on the basis that it is { insert Latin name } to find it is not . Also many of these fish are on the endangered species list , or extinct in the wild . It is our job , duty , whatever you want to call it to see they remain pure . I understand that many of the fish that are important to this hobby are hybrids , some are extremely exotic and sought after . Discus and angels come to mind . But in the African cichlid realm I don't believe they have any place at all . Rick.

ronv
06-16-2013, 06:26 AM
Very controversial subject that will sometimes cause a flaming war. The fact that your very first question on this forum is on a topic that is so argumentative causes me concern. Why did you ask that question?

heatherbeast
06-17-2013, 07:57 AM
I am not sure that it makes that much difference to consumers that will never have successful breeding pairs.

That said, it's been documented that lake pollution is already causing wild lake cichlids to hybridize (http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1046/j.1523-1739.1993.07030667.x/abstract), I feel that collection and breeding of existing species by hobbyists who do have the inclination and ability has become even more important. That's easy for me to say since I don't keep Africans, though!

the_cichlid_kid99
06-18-2013, 12:23 AM
Thanks for the info because I'm afraid that one of my peacock is going to breed with a different female of a different species

Demonfish
06-18-2013, 01:58 AM
All peacock females look alike so hybrids are easy to make. All of the "red" peacocks are hybrid already. so if you have "german red" or "dragon blood" or whatever, don't worry, but sell fry as hybrids. I wouldn't keep more than one peacock species per tank unless they are all male. You'll never sort them out again.

CHOPPER
06-19-2013, 07:20 AM
Just because it doesn`t exist in the wild don`t mean its a hybrid selective and line breeding can produce some very nice Red peacocks.I have no problem with that its not like its a Flowerhorn or something.

aXio
06-19-2013, 10:14 AM
Most of the peacocks are hybrids now a days anyway. And a lot of the "true varieties" that people order never existed in the wild in the first place.

aXio
06-19-2013, 10:17 AM
Very controversial subject that will sometimes cause a flaming war. The fact that your very first question on this forum is on a topic that is so argumentative causes me concern. Why did you ask that question?

Whats the point of having forums if your not going to have debates and discussion over topics like this? I think it's a very relevant topic now days. Everyone is trying to get into the breeding game. I have TONS of people trying to bring me Africans on a weekly basis at my store.

ronv
06-19-2013, 11:14 AM
Whats the point of having forums if your not going to have debates and discussion over topics like this? I think it's a very relevant topic now days.
The point is... Whatever your position is, no matter what is said here, no one is going to change their mind. This is a peaceful, friendly forum and we don't need what could turn into a shouting match.

Demonfish
06-19-2013, 11:34 AM
There are arguments about whether the A. "stuartgranti" are all one species. The males tend to hang about a small area and each area has its own colors while the females swim together is a school that goes all over. Stuart Grant was of the opinion that they are all the same species and Ad Konigs agrees because fish in no two adjacent areas are much different even though fish across they lake are quite distinct. But still if you throw all your peacocks in one tank you will lose the natural diversity of color varieties that are found in the lake. IMO its better to only keep fish from one collection location and try to breed them as "true" as possible. I know its not possible for fish that have been in the hobby long enough to be already mixed or lose the info. But if you buy wild or F! or F2 fish you really should make an effort. Otherwise, you can pay less and get a hobby strain instead.

kwseiders
06-19-2013, 12:33 PM
Without hybrids the aquarium industry would not be what it is today.

CHOPPER
06-19-2013, 02:13 PM
I think you should try and keep them as true as you can but over time and selective breeding you can get better color than wild caught. after all once you put them in a tank there not wild any more.

Demonfish
06-19-2013, 03:13 PM
Selective breeding is inevitable. You can't keep all the fry, so you pick for color or for the first to breed or the one who eats out of your hand or whatever.
Fish end up larger or meaner or just more nitrate tolerant. But you can't count on going back to the wild to get any fish again and don't trust other aquarists to keep a fsh either. There are fads and everyone has it, then no one does. If you like a fish, the only way to keep it is to keep it in your tank(s) and keep breeding it. Cross a fish and it can take you decades to "fix" the traits you want and you may still lose them all as a line-bred strain is vulnerable to any number of things.

superfly724
06-29-2013, 02:23 AM
Hybrids can look great, but only in a display tank. Intentionally breeding hybrids just dirties the gene pool. It makes it more difficult for people to know what they're actually getting. You can inbreed for certain desirable traits without hybridizing. Breeding hybrids with other hybrids can also be acceptable, since there's no saving that strain anyways, but breeding a hybrid with a pure strain is just a waste. But I'm also the kind of person that wants my tank as natural as possible.