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Thread: Drip System Experiment

  1. #1

    Drip System Experiment

    Hello!

    I have just run into the concept of drip systems (I have used the PVC overflow into a sumo before) but I really loved the idea of constant fresh water being provided to the tanks. I recently read a couple quick reviews of the system and a lot of them are concerned with DOC's not being removed completely. This would put it out of my using it because I would use it in a breeding rack and want to keep the water as clean as possible with out adding the stress of water changes.

    I wanted to use food coloring in an experiment and checked to make sure it was considered a DOC and it looks like it is. This was a very informal experiment, didnt account for all the variables, but was good enough to convince me that it's a system I am going to use.

    1) I set up 4 10 gal tanks. Filled them with untreated water from the outside hose. I added 10 drops of blue food dye to each tank
    2) I set up my PVC overflow with a wier and set up the drip system
    3) Turned it on with tank 1 (furtherst to the left) with the lowest setting and gradually increasing as I went down the row.

    After 1 hour of filtering the below are my results. Now I did forget to record the blue color before it started filtering but it's pretty close to result 1 on the left.

    I would really love to hear any feedback regarding my results, anything I may not have considered, other peoples experiences with drip systems or anything else on the matter.

    Thanks
    Untitled-1.jpg

  2. #2
    Drip system is the ultimate system ..... people complain about DOC because they either dont have adequate circulation in tank or their filtration system is compromised. ....


    If u have proper flow and good mechanical filtration ull never come across such problem. ....

    Sent from my SM-G7102 using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    most fish hatcheries and commercial places use this basic principle. but for them water doesnt cost as much. they usually are on a well, or have discounted rates. In the hatcheries i worked we used new water all the time. never did water changes. the fish grew like crazy, because of good water and incredible feeding loads

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by pinaki_pal View Post
    Drip system is the ultimate system ..... people complain about DOC because they either dont have adequate circulation in tank or their filtration system is compromised. ....


    If u have proper flow and good mechanical filtration ull never come across such problem. ....

    Sent from my SM-G7102 using Tapatalk
    This is absolutely not true in all cases. I can't speak to it's affects on all fish but I can speak to how it affects discus and in particular young discus that are growing. Juvies under the age of 4 to 5 months are in a high growth stage, up to 1" per month. At this age we find that they can be very adversely affected by bacteria in the water. The bacteria feeds on dissolved organic compounds (docs) in the water column. The docs come from left over food and detritus in the tank. At the higher temps we keep discus the bacteria can grow very quickly. The only way to really keep these docs at a minimum is through water changes so during this stage of the discus life we recommend doing very large water changes daily. Experience has proven that this is necessary if you want to grow out a discus to it's full potential. One other point to keep in mind is that in the Amazon, where discus live, the PH is typically very low, much lower than the Ph in most of our tanks. At this low PH bacteria is inhibited and is not present like it is in our tanks. With adult discus I would have no problem using a drip system but not with grow outs.
    Larry Bugg
    NADA (North American Discus Association) BOD Member
    SEDE, Southeast Discus Enthusiast

  5. #5
    In India i have seen discus breeders to change water 50% daily.... when i asked them they told me dominant discus believe to release a hormone which stunts others growth.... now i dont know the reality of it...but if u follow Joye's video in utube he keeps discus using same technique ......


    I have not kept discus so will not comment about that...but have kept Malawi n used this method. ..i had success. ....

    Sent from my SM-G7102 using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    I'll refrain commenting if its discus. .because i believe its a diff ball game for them...... they tend to b more defficult to keep than other fishes which i have kept. ... but again there r 2 aspects. .... if u talk about wild discus u have to maintain low ph...so its not possible to maintain a steady flow of low ph using drip if ur source has higher ph.........

    Sent from my SM-G7102 using Tapatalk

  7. #7
    Board Of Directors aXio's Avatar
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    Larry made some very good points. The drip method will be useful in certain situations, but one needs to be very careful fully relying on this type of technique. There are a lot of things that can go wrong...

    Drip systems must be checked on a regular basis for consistent water flow, to be safe you will have to test each individual tank on a regular basis to make sure you are actually filtering properly and not just diluting the waste in the water. As Pinaki mentioned to avoid water changes you will need really good flow in these tanks to make sure the organic waste is truly being filtered out... and high flow and fry usually do not mix very well. Most people use very small diameter tubing for drip systems... which can get clogged easily. Ideally tanks would need to be drilled so the water can just "overflow" out of the tank.

    If we are talking about breeding fish which I'm assuming we are since that is normally where a drip method is used... to me it just seems easier to do a quick 5min water change. Just throws out so many variables to not have to worry about imo. Most tanks are bare bottom for breeding purposes so water changes should be very fast. With decent water changes all you need is a sponge filter... no need for flow, hefty mechanical filtration, etc. Unless it is a massive hatchery or farm I just don't see it being more convenient or a better option over a good quick and easy water change.

    And I don't mean this about the OP... but people in this hobby seem to want to avoid water changes like the plague... and I just don't know why.
    Last edited by aXio; 11-12-2016 at 09:35 AM.
    Jakub Lapinski - Premier Aquatics Manager
    Premier Aquatics - (770) 321-8404
    Email - jakub@premieraquatics.net

    aX·i·o
    ·mat·ic - taken for granted : self-evident or unquestionable.

  8. #8
    Dominant Discus rrleases one horemone which stunts other discus's growth....... is it true ??? I heard it from almost all discus breeders from India.....

    Sent from my SM-G7102 using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Using blue dye is not the best for that sort of trial mostly due to the fact that at low levels it is no longer detectable by the eye. Cameras are even worse at picking up subtle color changes. A possible better imperial method of your test is if you had a TDS meter (total dissolved solids). Not exactly DOCs, but related. If you filled the test tanks with old aquarium water which has elevated TDS, and dripped in fresh water, you can actually measure the drop over time. I'd record initial TDS, supply water TDS (baseline) and TDS over time. You will find it will take a very long time to get any of the tanks equal to the supply water due to dilution.

    This type of test will validate what Larry already has discovered through practice with Discus. But if you're working with a non-discus species, you might find it is a very viable solution similar to the fish industry.

    Hope my thinking out loud has interested you.

  10. #10
    Board Of Directors aXio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pinaki_pal View Post
    Dominant Discus rrleases one horemone which stunts other discus's growth....... is it true ??? I heard it from almost all discus breeders from India.....

    Sent from my SM-G7102 using Tapatalk
    Larry would be better answering this question. But from my knowledge it is just a theory and has not been proven at all. Plus there are so many other things to consider... naturally there will be food competition so inevitably the smaller discus will get less food. Also there could be bullying going on from the large discus, which some say can cause stress to the smaller one which might cause stunting as well.

    In any case whether it's hormones, bullying, or food competition it generally best to keep discus close to the same size.
    Jakub Lapinski - Premier Aquatics Manager
    Premier Aquatics - (770) 321-8404
    Email - jakub@premieraquatics.net

    aX·i·o
    ·mat·ic - taken for granted : self-evident or unquestionable.

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