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Thread: Aged Water

  1. #1

    Aged Water

    Hello:

    How long do you wait until you use your tap water for WC without using any additives?

    Thank you,

    Pierre

  2. #2
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    I've heard 24 hours, but I would go at least 48 and more likely 72. You can get chlorine tests in pool supplies. The chlorine will come out as long as there is only chlorine and not chloramine added. Most places around here don't habitually use chloramine, but nothing prevents them from switching without warning.

  3. #3
    Board Of Directors Apisto Jim's Avatar
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    My tanks get 50% water changes every 7-10 days. I have a 44 gallon trash barrel with a submersible pump that I use to store/age water. It has a box filter to aerate the water and help reduce chemicals and metals, and I heat the water to the mid-70s in winter. In the summer I usually change all tanks in a marathon water change using about 240 gallons. As I use a hose outlet with cold water, I wait until the water is in the upper 60's or above before using un-aged water.

    My gammarus shrimp and any tanks with fry or breeders are done first getting the aged water. I keep topping off the trash barrel as I go, adding Prime with each addition. Never had a problem using fresh water as long as the temperature is moderate.

  4. #4
    My tanks get a 30 to 50% water change every 7 to 14 days. I always add prime to the tank (for the amount of water I am replacing) then use my trusty python and fill the tank from the tap. In the winter I mix the hot/cold water until I get the temperature that matches the tanks. In the summer, after the tap water is in the 70s, I just add cold water.

    When I accidentally changed the water in the gammarus tank, using tap water to which prime was inadvertently NOT added (usually I just topped it off with water from another tank, and I only added about a cup in their 2 gallon bowl), I murdered them all! And the daphnia! It was a sad day! One must remember to use prime (or something to remove the chlorine).

  5. #5
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    I will often let buckets sit full overnight or longer, but I always use either Prime or another anti-ammonia declor. Having killed many fish when chloramine was first added to tap water (long ago and far away) without warning, I have no wish to go through that again.

  6. #6
    If you are only replacing 30-50% water, you can use cold water out of the tap, but first add Prime or Safe (prime in powder form) to the volume of the tank.
    I did this the whole winter and never had a dead fish. Temp dropped 5-8F but fish seemed to like it, even bred like crazy (GBR's, Apisto's, Angels, even the Rasboras showed breeding behavior). For top offs, I use tapwater without dechlorinator.

    I wouldn't use straight (cold) tapwater to replace more than 50%.
    Also be careful with sensitive species, like shrimp and microfish.

    EDIT: sorry I didn't answer your question.

    I would always add dechlorinator to aged water, just to be sure.
    Last edited by nalu86; 07-08-2012 at 06:47 PM.

  7. #7
    So its seems that the consensus is using Prime or other products no matter how long you let the water age because of potential chloramine presence. How about using UV light to remove chloramine as it could be cheaper?

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Pierre View Post
    So its seems that the consensus is using Prime or other products no matter how long you let the water age because of potential chloramine presence. How about using UV light to remove chloramine as it could be cheaper?

    Does UV light removes chloramines? I thought it only killed bacteria, fungus and algae (plants, fish and life)...

    I know ro/di removes it.

  9. #9
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    Safe is pretty cheap 1/8 tsp for 20 gallons. Prime is 1/2 ml for 5 gallons. And I'm told you can just use a double dose of sodium thiosulfate. So it really isn't that much, even if you change a lot of water. Way back, we would add the drop per gallon dechlor and then age the water with a cycled box filter for 3 days to deal with the ammonia. Most dechlors also have a little bit of EDTA to "detoxify heavy metals" which can be an issue if you have old pipes or get will water (Arsenic is naturally occurring). You probably don't need Prime, but it is pretty cheap insurance and will protect fish from an ammonia spike when you clean the filter. And it is a convenience to use water that hasn't aged enough to trust.

    RO/DI will take it out and some other filter methods may also. We really don't need RO here as the lake/river water is so low in everything. I just hope the water companies don't try out any new additives (such as zinc orthophosphate) on us.
    Last edited by Demonfish; 07-09-2012 at 12:17 AM.

  10. #10
    Board Of Directors Apisto Jim's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Demonfish View Post
    Most dechlors also have a little bit of EDTA to "detoxify heavy metals" which can be an issue if you have old pipes or get will water (Arsenic is naturally occurring).
    Actually, new copper piping is the most dangerous to sensitive fish and shrimp. Old pipes - even lead - stop leaching metals into the water over time and become coated with minerals ("scale") in all but very acidic water.

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